Introduction

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introduction

Post by mazrush on Thu Aug 14, 2008 3:59 pm

Hi. My name’s Maz and my ponies are like potato chips, I have 4, 2 left over from when my kids were young and 2 coloured ponies, a piebald and a skewbald. I joined the forum and ordered my bitless bridle at about the same time. It’s been really helpful to read everyone’s comments and suggestions. I didn’t think I had anything to add, being so new to the bitless concept so have been ‘lurking’. I love my DC bridle and have just bought a second one. Will have to save a bit longer for 2 more.

This is my experience of bitless so far. My main ride, (13.2 piebald ,Diesel, is no trouble to ride and quite well schooled and is the same in his bitless. He can be strong in company when cantering and galloping and he is much easier to control in the DC and I feel he is more comfortable on long hacks as he doesn’t yawn and snatch the reins or rub his face when I get off anymore. My little skewbald, Xanthe, is much more comfortable bitless but still has some issues. She is very heavy on the right rein when schooling and throws her head up when I ask for halt. She doesn’t have hissy fits or run backwards like she can do in a bit but there is a lot of résistance still there. On hacks she is fine and very easy to steer and control and has stopped being impatient at junctions on the road which was one of her more dangerous habits. Any ideas welcomed.
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mazrush

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Re: Introduction

Post by lightertouch on Fri Aug 15, 2008 6:27 am

Welcome Maz!

With Xanthe I'd keep the mantra going round in my head 'Pressure and Release, Pressure and Release'. I have been having a similar prob with my 5 y.o. leaning on the left rein when hacking. She doesn't like walking on the left side of the road, so I've unconsciously started leaning myself, so she leans on me. Instead, I try to request a move to the left, then releasing when she does so. I'd also advise many, many circles.

With the halt, I'm not sure I can explain this very well, but... try to use your weight rather than your reins to stop her. This will probably be a gradual change, but if you take a breath in just before you halt, then release it as you request the halt, while thinking 'halt' in your head and trying to get your weight sinking down through your seat and your heels and out all the way to the ground, this may help?! The results can be marvelous, I hardly touch the reins when I want to halt now Very Happy Very Happy Very Happy

Gald to hear you're getting on so well bitless!
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Re: Introduction

Post by Sydney on Fri Aug 15, 2008 8:32 am

I always tell my students:
Sit on the pockets of your jeans, take a deep breath and exhale when you want to stop and put your heels down.
Think of it this way: An airplane has to have its wheels down before it can land so it won't crash. your heels have to be down (deep seat) when you halt or you are going to crash.

Breathing halts you can do on a leadline. Breathe in deep, exhale, halt the horse.

I prefer the one rein stop. My mare both know it well all I have to do it tighten one rein more than the other and they both tip their noses a little and halt.
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Re: Introduction

Post by bohohorse on Fri Aug 15, 2008 2:19 pm

Welcome to the forum Mazrush! glad you have you on Very Happy

I agree with the above posts with one possible exception; I like to lighten the seat for a downward transition. The theory behind it is that then the back can remain rounded upwards rather than being pushed hollow. At the same time, stop following the movement and feel the stop. Works very well for us, I now just have to think it and twitch the muscles in my behind! I aim only use the reins - and therefore bridle- for refinement and a subtle way of communicating with the front end, therefore there is nothing for him to resist.

Regarding the one sidedness - you may already have eliminated this but do check for stiffness or pain. All horses, like us are naturally one sided anyway but make sure there is nothing more sinister going on. Then work only a little on the bad side and lots on the good side. That way, she will associate the 'bad' side with a rest and come to like it a little better instead of becoming even stiffer or more resistant. (a Richard Maxwell tip). Other ideas are to drop the rein as soon as she starts to lean. Doesn't always work, some horses will happily toddle round with their noses on the ground! but for a lot it does the trick to teach them that you aren't going to be their 'fifth leg'
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Re: Introduction

Post by Admin on Sat Aug 16, 2008 3:06 pm

Hi Maz and welcome to the forum
sunny sunny
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Re: Introduction

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